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SEO Ranking Factors (2)

Today

Posted by JoyHawkins

Fake reviews are a growing problem for those of us that own small businesses. In the online world, it's extremely easy to create a new account and leave either a positive or negative review for any business — regardless of whether you’ve ever tried to hire them.

Google [...]

mer, Feb 21, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)
Earlier

Posted by sanfran

What does Google consider “quality content"? And how do you capitalize on a seemingly subjective characteristic to improve your standing in search?

We’ve been trying to figure this out since the Hummingbird algorithm was dropped in our laps in 2013, prioritizing “context” over “keyword usage/frequency.” This meant that [...]

mar, Feb 20, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)

Posted by willcritchlow

Digital marketing is measurable.

It’s probably the single most common claim everyone hears about digital, and I can’t count the number of times I’ve seen conference speakers talk about it (heck, I’ve even done it myself).

I mean, look at those offline dinosaurs, the argument goes. They [...]

lun, Feb 19, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)
Using the Cross Domain Rel=Canonical to Maximize the SEO Value of X-Posted Content

Posted by randfish

Same content, different domains? There's a tag for that. Using rel=canonical to tell Google that similar or identical content exists on multiple domains has a number of clever applications. You can cross-post content across several domains that you own, you can benefit from others republishing your own [...]

ven, Feb 16, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)

To use, start by choosing a part of your page to look at first. Order doesn’t matter, so whether you choose to first check “spelling and grammar” or “continuity” is up to you. Next, assign it a score on a separate Excel sheet (or mark it directly on the rubric) based on its current performance. For example, if the copy has no spelling errors but some minor grammar issues, you would rank “spelling and grammar” as a four (4).

Finally, repeat this process until all elements are graded. Remember to stay impartial to give an honest assessment.

Once you’re done, look at each grade and see where it falls on the scale. Ideally each element should have a score of 4 or greater, although a grade of 5 should only be given out sparingly. Tying back to my spectrum comment from earlier, a 5 is exclusively reserved for top-level work and should be something to strive for but will typically take more effort to achieve than it is worth. A grade of 4 is often the highest and most reasonable goal to attempt for, in most instances.

A grade of 3 or below indicates an opportunity for improvement and that significant changes need to be made.

If working with multiple pieces of content at once, the grading system can also be used to help prioritize your workload. Just collect the average writing or design score and sort them in ascending/descending order. Pages with a lower average indicate poorer performance and should be prioritized over pages whose averages are higher.

Whether you choose to use this scorecard or make your own, what you review, the span of the grading scale, and the criteria for each grade should be adjusted to fit your specific needs and result in a tool that will help you honestly assess your content across multiple applications.

Don’t forget the keywords

With most areas of your content covered by the scorecard, the last element to check before moving to the editing stage is your keywords.

Before I get slack for this, I’m aware that the general rule of creating content is to do your keyword research first. But I’ve found that when it comes to reviews, evaluating keywords last feels more natural and makes the process a lot smoother. When first running through a page, you’re much more likely to notice spelling and design flaws before you pick up whether a keyword is used correctly — why not make note of those details first?

Depending on the outcomes stemming from the re-evaluation of your target audience and content performance review, you will notice one of two things about your currently targeted keywords:

They have not been impacted by the outcomes of the prior analyses and do not need to be altered They no longer align with the goals of the page or needs of the audience and should be changed

In the first example, the keywords you originally target are still best suited for your content’s message and no additional research is needed. So, your only remaining task is to determine whether or not your keywords are effectively used throughout the page. This means assessing things like title tag, image alt attributes, URL, and copy.

In an attempt to stay on track, I won’t go into further detail on how to optimize keywords but if you want a little more insight,

Posted by Jackie.Francis

In SEO, reviewing content is an unavoidable yet extremely important task. As the driving factor that brings people to a page, best practice dictates that we do what we can to ensure that the work we've invested hours and resources into creating remains impactful and relevant over [...]

gio, Feb 15, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)

Posted by MiriamEllis

It's February, and we've all dipped our toes into the shallow end of the 2018 pool. Today, let's dive into the deeper waters of the year ahead, with local search marketing predictions from Moz's Local SEO Subject Matter Expert, our Marketing Scientist, and our SEO & Content [...]

mer, Feb 14, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)

Posted by Dr-Pete

Over the past year, you may have spotted a new kind of Google ad on a local search. It looks something like this one (on a search for "oil change" from my Pixel phone in the Chicago suburbs):

These ads seem to appear primarily on mobile results, with [...]

mar, Feb 13, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)
Diagnosing why a site's pages may be ranking poorly

Posted by randfish

Your rankings have dropped and you don't know why. Maybe your traffic dropped as well, or maybe just a section of your site has lost rankings. It's an important and often complex mystery to solve, and there are a number of boxes to check off while you [...]

ven, Feb 09, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)

Posted by BritneyMuller

Back in mid-November, we kicked off a campaign to rewrite our biggest piece of content: the Beginner's Guide to SEO. You offered up a huge amount of helpful advice and insight with regards to our outline, and today we're here to share our draft of [...]

gio, Feb 08, 2018
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)

Last week, I passed my one year anniversary as head of the US Digital Service (USDS). So when Mr. Money Mustache asked for an interview, I was delighted to talk about some of the work that the USDS does. If you aren’t familiar with Mr. Money Mustache, he writes [...]

lun, Gen 22, 2018
Source Matt Cutts Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)
USDS logo

A few months ago, I took a leave of absence from Google to do a stint with the US Digital Service. A lot of people know about the US Digital Service because they helped rescue the healthcare.gov website. But you might not realize that the US Digital Service [...]

gio, Gen 19, 2017
Source Matt Cutts Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)
ssd:private:var:folders:m2:wh1vdy452ps54mq15f_w0jlh0000gn:T:qJyinA:Google Chrome.png

Posted by Todd_McDonald

A steady rise in content-related marketing disciplines and an increasing connection between effective SEO and content has made the benefits of harnessing strategic content clearer than ever. However, success isn't always easy. It's often quite difficult, as I’m sure many of you know.

A number [...]

mar, Set 13, 2016
Source SEO Moz Blog Category: RANKING FACTORS (2)